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Princess Diana

 
 

CHILDHOOD AND TEENAGE YEARS

 
 
Diana, Princess of Wales, formerly Lady Diana Frances Spencer, was born on 1 July 1961 at Park House near Sandringham, Norfolk. She was the youngest daughter of the then Viscount and Viscountess Althorp, now the late (8th) Earl Spencer and the late Hon. Mrs Shand-Kydd, daughter of the 4th Baron Fermoy.
 
 
 

Earl Spencer was Equerry to George VI from 1950 to 1952, and to The Queen from 1952 to 1954. Lady Diana's parents, who had married in 1954, separated in 1967 and the marriage was dissolved in 1969. Earl Spencer later married Raine, Countess of Dartmouth in 1976. Together with her two elder sisters Sarah (born 1955), Jane (born 1957) and her younger brother Charles (born 1964), Lady Diana continued to live with her father at Park House, Sandringham, until the death of her grandfather, the 7th Earl Spencer. In 1975, the family moved to the

 
 
Spencer seat at Althorp (a stately house dating from 1508) in Northamptonshire, in the English Midlands.
Lady Diana was educated first at a preparatory school, Riddlesworth Hall at Diss, Norfolk, and then in 1974 went as a boarder to West Heath, near Sevenoaks, Kent. At school she showed a particular talent for music (as an accomplished pianist), dancing and domestic science, and gained the school's award for the girl giving maximum help to the school and her schoolfellows.
She left West Heath in 1977 and went to finishing school at the Institut Alpin Videmanette in Rougemont, Switzerland, which she left after the Easter term of 1978. The following year she moved to a flat in Coleherne Court, London. For a while she looked after the child of an American couple, and she worked as a kindergarten teacher at the Young England School in Pimlico.

 
     
 

MARRIAGE AND FAMILY

 
 
On 24 February 1981 it was officially announced that Lady Diana was to marry The Prince of Wales. As neighbours at Sandringham until 1975, their families had known each other for many years, and Lady Diana and the The Prince had met again when he was invited to a weekend at Althorp in November 1977.
 
 
 
They were married at St Paul's Cathedral in London on 29 July 1981, in a ceremony which drew a global television and radio audience estimated at around 1,000 million people, and hundreds of thousands of people lining the route from Buckingham Palace to the Cathedral. The wedding reception was at Buckingham Palace.
 The marriage was solemnised by the Archbishop of Canterbury Dr Runcie, together with the Dean of St Paul's; clergy from other denominations read prayers. Music included the hymns
'Christ is made the sure foundation', 'I vow to thee my country',
composed anthem 'Let the people praise thee' by Professor
 
 
Mathias, and Handel's 'Let the bright seraphim' performed by Dame Kiri te Kanawa. The lesson was read by the Speaker of the House of Commons, Mr George Thomas (the late Lord Tonypandy). The Princess was the first Englishwoman to marry an heir to the throne for 300 years (when Lady Anne Hyde married the future James II from whom the Princess was descended). The bride wore a silk taffeta dress with a 25-foot train designed by the Emanuels, her veil was held in place by the Spencer family diamond tiara, and she carried a bouquet of gardenias, lilies-of-the-valley, white freesia, golden roses, white orchids and stephanotis. She was attended by five bridesmaids including Princess Margaret's daughter Lady Sarah Armstrong-Jones (now Lady Sarah Chatto); Prince Andrew (now The Duke of York) and Prince Edward were The Prince of Wales's supporters (a Royal custom instead of a best man).
 The Prince and Princess of Wales spent part of their honeymoon at the Mountbatten family home at Broadlands, Hampshire, before flying to Gibraltar to join the Royal Yacht HMY BRITANNIA for a 12-day cruise through the Mediterranean to Egypt. They finished their honeymoon with a stay at Balmoral.
The Prince and Princess made their principal home at Highgrove House near Tetbury, Gloucestershire, and shared an apartment in Kensington Palace.
 
The Princess of Wales had two sons. Prince William Arthur Philip Louis was born on 21 June 1982 and Prince Henry (Harry) Charles Albert David on 15 September 1984, both at St Mary's Hospital, Paddington, in London. The Princess had seventeen godchildren.
 
In December 1992 it was announced that The Prince and Princess of Wales had agreed to separate. The Princess based her household and her office at Kensington Palace, while The Prince was based at St James's Palace and continued to live at Highgrove.
In November 1995, the Princess gave a television interview during which she spoke of her unhappiness in her personal life and the pressures of her public role. The Prince and Princess were divorced on 28 August 1996.
 
The Prince and Princess continued to share equal responsibility for the upbringing of their children. The Princess, as the mother of Prince William (second in line to the throne), continued to be regarded as a member of the Royal family. The Queen, The Prince and The Princess of Wales agreed that the Princess was to be known after the divorce as Diana, Princess of Wales, without the style of 'Her Royal Highness' (as the Princess was given the style 'HRH' on marriage she would therefore be expected to give it up on divorce).
The Princess continued to live at Kensington Palace, with her office based there.
 
     
 

PUBLIC ROLE

 
 

After her marriage, The Princess of Wales quickly became involved in the official duties of the Royal Family.
Her first tour with The Prince of Wales was a three-day visit to Wales in October 1981. In 1983 she accompanied the Prince on a tour of Australia and New Zealand, and they took the infant Prince William with them. Prince William, with Prince Harry, again joined The Prince and Princess of Wales at the end of their tour to Italy in 1985.

 
 
Other official overseas visits undertaken with the Prince included Australia (for the bicentenary celebrations in 1988), Brazil, India, Canada, Nigeria, Cameroon, Indonesia, Spain, Italy, France, Portugal and Japan (for the enthronement of Emperor Akihito). Their last joint overseas visit was to South Korea in 1992.
 
The Princess's first official visit overseas on her own was in September
 
 
 

1982, when she represented The Queen at the State funeral of Princess Grace of Monaco. The Princess's first solo overseas tour was in February 1984, when she travelled to Norway to attend a performance of Carmen by the London City Ballet, of which she was Patron. The Princess subsequently visited many countries including Germany, the United States, Pakistan, Switzerland, Hungary, Egypt, Belgium, France, South Africa, Zimbabwe and Nepal.
 
Although the Princess was renowned for her style and was closely associated with the fashion world, patronising and raising the profile of younger British designers, she was best known for her charitable work.
 
During her marriage, the Princess was president or patron of over 100 charities. The Princess did much to publicise work on behalf of homeless and also disabled people, children and people with HIV/Aids.

In December 1993, the Princess announced that she would be reducing the extent of her public life in order to combine 'a meaningful public role with a more private life'.

After her separation from The Prince of Wales, the Princess continued to appear with the Royal Family on major national occasions, such as the commemorations of the 50th anniversary of VE (Victory in Europe) and VJ (Victory over Japan) Days in 1995.
 
Following her divorce, the Princess resigned most of her charity and other patronages, and relinquished all her Service appointments with military units. The Princess remained as patron of Centrepoint (homeless charity), English National Ballet, Leprosy Mission and National Aids Trust, and as President of the Hospital for Sick Children, Great Ormond Street and of the Royal Marsden Hospital.

In June 1997, the Princess attended receptions in London and New York as previews of the sale of a number of dresses and suits worn by her on official engagements, with the proceeds going to charity.
The Princess spent her 36th and last birthday on 1 July 1997 attending the Tate Gallery's 100th anniversary celebrations. Her last official engagement in Britain was on 21 July, when she visited Northwick Park Hospital, London (children's accident and emergency unit).
 
In the year before her death, the Princess was an active campaigner for a ban on the manufacture and use of land mines. In January 1997, she visited Angola as part of her campaign. in June, the Princess spoke at the landmines conference at the Royal Geographical Society in London, and this was followed by a visit to Washington DC in the United States on 17/18 June to promote the American Red Cross landmines campaign (separately, she also met Mother Teresa in the Bronx, New York). The Princess's last public engagements were during her visit to Bosnia from 7 to 10 August, when she visited landmine projects in Travnic, Sarajevo and Zenezica.
It was in recognition of her charity work that representatives of the charities with which she worked during her life were invited to walk behind her coffin with her family from St James's Palace to Westminster Abbey on the day of her funeral.
The funeral of Diana, Princess of Wales took place at Westminster Abbey on 6 September 1997. It was watched by millions of people on television world-wide, as well as by thousands of mourners along the route.

The Princess's coffin was interred on the same day in a private ceremony at Althorp in the afternoon of the same day as the funeral. 

 
     
 

THE FUNERAL

 
 

The funeral of Diana, Princess of Wales took place on Saturday, 6 September, in Westminster Abbey. It began at 11.00 a.m. and lasted for about one hour.
Before moving in Procession to the Abbey for the service, the Princess's coffin had lain at the Chapel Royal, within St James's Palace, until the evening before the funeral.

It was then moved to the Princess's apartment at Kensington Palace, where it remained overnight. The Bishop of London and the Sub-Dean of the Chapels Royal kept a candlelit vigil of prayer over the Princess's coffin throughout the night.

 
 
  On the morning of the funeral her coffin was borne in Procession from Kensington Palace to Westminster Abbey. Her brother, Earl Spencer, Prince William, Prince Harry, The Prince of Wales and The Duke of Edinburgh, joined the Procession in The Mall and walked behind the coffin to the Abbey.
Following the service, the Princess's coffin was taken by road to the Spencer family home at Althorp for private burial in
 
 

sanctified ground on an island in the centre of an ornamental lake. The grave faces east, towards the rising sun.
The Althorp estate was opened to members of the public who wished to view the lake where the Princess is buried, from 1 July 1998 to 30 August 1998. Details can be found on the Althorp House web site at www.althorp.com.
Books of condolence were opened for signing at St James's Palace and at Kensington Palace until 21 September. The books were then offered to the Spencer family.

Some 580,000 condolence messages sent electronically in the week after the Princess's death were also offered to the Princess's family.

It was estimated that 31 million people in Britain and two and a half billion people around the world watched the funeral on television.

 
     
 

OUTLINE OF FUNERAL ARRANGEMENTS

 
 

Movement of the coffin to St James's Palace

 
 
 

Following completion of the coroner's formalities, the coffin was taken to the Chapel Royal in St James's Palace in the early hours of Monday, 1 September, where it remained until the night of Friday, 5 September.
It was then moved to rest overnight in the Princess's apartment at Kensington Palace.

Procession to Westminster Abbey
The Procession began from Kensington Palace on the morning of Saturday, 6 September at 9.08 a.m. The Princess's coffin, borne on

 
 

a gun carriage of the King's Troop, Royal Horse Artillery, and escorted on foot by a bearer party from the Welsh Guards and by mounted police, was taken to Westminster Abbey along a route lined by tens of thousands of mourners.

The route passed Hyde Park, where many thousands more watched the Procession and service on two giant screens. At Hyde Park Corner, the Procession passed under Wellington Arch before moving into Constitution Hill.

The Queen led members of the Royal Family in paying their respects outside Buckingham Palace.

Earl Spencer, Prince William, Prince Harry, The Prince of Wales and The Duke of Edinburgh joined the Procession in The Mall, together with 500 charity representatives, to walk behind the coffin on its journey to Westminster Abbey.
 
     
 

Funeral service

 
  The Order of Service is reproduced in full under Order of service.
 
     
 

Westminster Abbey to Althorp

 
 
The funeral cortège travelled to Althorp by road. Family members travelled to Northamptonshire separately on board the Royal Train.
 
     
 

Committal and interment

 
 
The coffin was subsequently interred in a private ceremony at Althorp in the afternoon of the same day as the funeral, in sanctified ground on a small island in the centre of a tranquil ornamental lake.
 
 
 

The Althorp estate was opened to members of the public who wished to view the lake where the Princess is buried, from 1 July 1998 to 30 August 1998. Further details can be found on the Althorp House web site at www.althorp.com. 
The funeral service of Diana, Princess of Wales at Westminster Abbey on Saturday 6 September 1997 contained elements from all aspects of her life.
It combined traditional and modern music, readings and an address from the Princess's brother, Earl Spencer.

 
 
The service lasted about one hour, finishing with a one-minute silence observed by the nation shortly after midday.
This section reproduces the order of service for the funeral of Diana, Princess of Wales.
 
     
 

Diana in childhood age:

 
 
Lady Diana grew up under the influence of British royal family’s estate since they stayed close to the royal family. For little kid Diana the royalty and way of behavior towards them was never really a point of concern they enjoyed with the royal family. She called the Queen as "Aunt Lilibet". The Queen and Queen Mother were open minded and believed that money should not be the criterion for developing relationships and so they allowed the friendship between the royal children and the Spencer girls. All of the Diana's grandparents served on the Queen Mother's personal staff.

Diana’s parents were married in the 1954. The difference in their thinking led to their separation in 1967 and they got officially divorced in 1969. Earl Spencer felt in love with Raine from Dartmouth and got married to her in 1976.

Diana had two sister’s named Sarah and Jane and a younger brother Charles. Diana took admission at fashionable West Heath boarding school in Sevenoaks, Kent. She was an average student in study, loved swimming and enjoyed playing tennis and lacrosse in her school days. The divorce of her parents when she was eight created an impact on her mind. She clearly knew that what a child wants is love his parents and so she always had caring nature towards all the deprived children.

After completing her schooling in the year 1978 she served as a waitress and cleaning woman. After this she became a teacher at the Young England kindergarten in Pimlico, London. Soon her relationship with Prince of Wales, heir to the throne of the United Kingdom intensified. Princess Diana was a hot topic for the press and took a special interest in gathering her reports. By 19, Lady Diana Spencer became a headline for the national media. She gave a self-conscious but charming smile for the cameras that earned her the nickname "Shy Di" in July 29, 1981

 
     
 

Wedding of Diana

 
 
Prince Charles proposed to Diana in February 6, 1981.On February 24 they appeared together in public for the first time at the official engagement announcement. They got married to each other on July 29, 1981at St. Paul's Cathedral. At the time of wedding Charles was 32 and Diana 20. The twelve year age difference between them wasn’t a point of botheration for the couple.

She was also the first English woman to wed a successor to England's throne in over 300 years.The marriage ceremony was shown on TV in 74 countries and watched by 750 million people worldwide. Princess Diana’s marriage was romantic and fairytale come true, the kind that every girl dreamed of. Her engagement ring was an 18-carat sapphire surrounded by diamonds. They then went for their Honeymoon to Hampshire and aboard the royal yacht Britannia in the Mediterranean.
 
     
 

Diana after marriage

 
 
Diana’s main duty was to provide a successor to the throne. On 21st June 1982, Prince William Arthur Philip Louis was born and Prince Henry Charles Albert David on 15th September 1984, both at St Mary's Hospital, Paddington, in London.

The couple’s relationship was not going smooth and the press predicted that both were involved in extramarital affairs. Charles’ friendship with Camilla Parker Bowles was strongly highlighted in media. Also Diana’s romance with a cavalry officer, James Hewitt was a subject for press. As the years passed by the tension between the two began to increase which was seen even in their public appearances.

In the year 1992 Princess Diana made up her mind to reveal the fact about her relationship with Prince Charles to the public. She decided to write a book on her life. She then approached to author Andrew Morton who wrote the book Diana, Her True Story. This was kept secret by them to the public until her death.

Finally the couple got separated on December 1992. The princess was hurt once more when Charles told in a television interview in June 1994 that he never loved Diana and admitted that he loved Parker Bowles. In 1995 she gave a BBC television interview in which she said that the Royal Family was uncaring.

The Prince and Princess were divorced on August 28, 1996. Despite her problems, she never neglected her duties as a mother. She always took their care. She always gave charity and kept herself busy in social work. Due to her love he humanity she was always loved by the public.
 
     
 

Diana’s second love and end of her life journey

 
 

In 1997 Princess Diana felt in love with Emad "Dodi" Fayed, the son of billionaire businessman Mohamed Al-Fayed. Their short span of romance ended on August 31, 1997 when both were killed in a car accident in Paris. They were trying to move in speed to get rid off the press people following them. Princess Diana's sudden death led to a wave of shock and grief throughout the world.

Millions of people were gathered at the streets of London to say goodbye to Princess Diana at her funeral. Billions of people all over the world watched the Princess Diana funeral on television. Just goes to show the place she created in the heart’s of people.

 
     
 

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